Adding Lambda Authorizers to your Serverless Applications

So you’ve developed a snazzy new Serverless API on AWS and everything is going great. That is until you realize that there might eventually be production data behind it that you don’t want someone with Postman and 20 minutes on their hands to have access to. That’s where Lambda Authorizers come in. They’re a way to make sure that your API will only respond to authorized callers. Let’s look at how to implement authorizers for ourselves using an example application called Serverless Jams - where we vote on our favorite coding-related music.

November 2019 - New AWS Lambda Features

November 2019 - New AWS Lambda Features

AWS recently annouced a bunch of new features for Lambda. You can read my summary and analysis of the new features on the Serverless Blog here in my post on the Serverless Blog. Disclosure: While I have used the Serverless Framework for years, as of this posting I am employed by Serverless Inc. (the makers of the Serverless Framework).
Lambda Supported Languages and Runtimes

Lambda Supported Languages and Runtimes

AWS recently added several managed Lambda runtimes. You can read about all the updates here in my post on the Serverless Blog. Disclosure: While I have used the Serverless Framework for years, as of this posting I am employed by Serverless Inc. (the makers of the Serverless Framework).
Serverless Application Patterns - Indexing Searchable User-Generated Content

Searchable content is a common component of many modern applications. But for applications that rely on a streams of new user-generated content how can we create a system that reliably and rapidly indexes searchable content and also provides ways to update, and act on changes to that data later on? This post will show you an architecture that can accomplish this using AWS services like Lambda, API Gateway, S3, Systems Manager Parameter Store, and DynamoDB. We’ll also use the third party provider Algolia for search.

AWS First-In-First-Out Queues

Recently, I needed to put together system that would take new DynamoDB table items, queue up JSON messages in first-in-first-out order, and trickle them out to a 3rd party API over time.

I love not having to maintain things later so I decided to throw together a solution on top of managed AWS services. Here’s a high-level diagram of what I came up with:

Full Queue Diagram

Let’s take a look at how it all works.